My hair

My hair has been a good and bad thing a lot of my life. Do I keep it long or short? Who will help me take care of it? I love it and then hate it.

Having a disability that means you can't use your hands too well is not good for styling hair the way you want. It means that you are at the mercy of others to help create the look you desire. Unfortunately, getting the look isn't always possible.

Most of my life I had long hair. I like long hair because it gives you more options. I had one attendant who would braid it daily. When she moved on, my hair went back to a ponytail. I've had other attendants who did good or ok with hair.

When I first met Jeff and he tried to help me with my hair early on, he needed help. It makes sense because why would he need to do someone's hair in the past? Over time, he learned and improved. He is now better at my hair than my attendants.

I also resisted short hair because of stereotypes of people with disabilities to have short hair so it's easy for the caregiver. I didn't want to be the stereotype.

A few weeks before I had Jason, my hair was long and often knotty. It took about 15-20min just to do my hair. As many of you know, I do not like sitting still very long. I decided to cut it. It was an ok look but not exactly what I wanted. I hated wearing headbands daily that made me not look my best.

So I went the shortest ever. I Iike it a lot. It takes no time to wash and styling it is fairly simple. Jeff is a perfectionist with my hair but it usually takes less than five minutes to do.

I still reach back sometimes to reach an absent ponytail or fix a potential headband. But mostly I'm happy with my hair especially now being a busy mom of two!

Comments

  1. It's really cute!

    I cut mine in my 50s, not to make it easier on attendants, but because I think long hair on older women looks silly. I'll be 60 in September...definitely too old!

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